Interview with an INKOM board member: Ella de Vries

You may know the INKOM, either because you participated, or because you’ve helped during this student introduction week of Maastricht.
The INKOM board is already busy with next year’s edition, and guess what, the new theme has been presented.. Curious about what you do in the INKOM board and what the theme for INKOM 2015 is? Read on!

Personal info
Name: Ella de Vries
Age: 23
Study: Medicine, 6th year
Position (Inkom): secretary

Why did you want to help organising the INKOM?

Two years ago I wanted to do something between my bachelor and master studies. Since I started studying when I was 17 years old and I would start with specified ward walking soon, this was the perfect opportunity to do something extracurricular. I looked at the possibilities of such a gap year. At that time I knew two people from the INKOM and seeing as I’m in the independent sorority Ex Aequo, I already knew a bit about this introduction week. I wanted to go in the board of the INKOM. At that point I was still too inexperienced to apply, so I waited a year while being crew-member last year.
As for what I’d like to learn during this year. I want to experience the different aspects of such a board year, learn how to set priorities and become more apt at managing stress.

When do the preparations for the INKOM start?

After the INKOM the board does an evaluation of how it went. Within this month after the INKOM the new board gets appointed and prepares for their year. The old board and Astrid Boeijen, head of the Student Service Center pick a new board. Of course a board has to be able to end their INKOM and be able to see how things went so a new board can take the points that need to be improved and integrate it in their program.

During the interview in the Student Service Center

During the interview in the Student Service Center

How many people does the INKOM team consist of?

5 board members of the INKOM, depicted in the following order (left to right): Daphne Peters (president), Charlotte Klüter (vice-president), me (secretary), Marenne Hoogenboom (treasurer) and Werner Rijkers (Logistical manager).

werkgroep_inkom_2015

The INKOM board

Where does this year’s theme come from?

The theme of the INKOM this year is ‘Time to Shine’. We came up with the theme during our first week as board, and had to keep it secret for a long time! The idea is that everyone that takes part in the INKOM, as participant, crew-member, student, commercial partners. For all of these people, it’s the time to shine!

To get a better impression on the exact meaning, check the video below.


What did you change for this year’s INKOM?

We took last year’s program and built further on that. In 2013 there was a big change in the set-up of the INKOM, where an extra day was added for instance. Seeing as we have a successful concept that works, we’re using the knowledge of the past few years. What also really helps, is that we ask our contacts and the parties involved to evaluate the cooperation and we use that in our plan on what to improve and what stays good.

What advice did the people organising the INKOM over the past years give you?

To enjoy it! The best advice that I’ve gotten is to make your own INKOM and to enjoy every minute of it. It’s also very important to organize your activities in such a way that if, God forbid, I’m sick during the INKOM, the Central Post can still organize my event, just based on my instructions and preparations.

Student Service Center

Student Service Center

What surprised you in your job?

I used to think it would be easier to organize something. But once you’re in the same position, the task seems more elaborate, also because you’re dependent on other people. As we’re working a whole year for an event of a week, it takes quite a lot of things before you can call the INKOM a done deal! People don’t realize that.

People don’t expect us….

To be busy for a whole year, but you really need it!

What is your personal highlight of the INKOM?

It sounds silly, but the registrations are crucial. All the participants are there. This year we’re improving some logistical points of the registration day. This way there’s a smaller gap between registering and the first activity.

When will you consider the INKOM a success?

That’s a tough question, I think when everyone has a fantastic INKOM. I think that organizing such an event with 5 people is tough. If that works for us without any major hiccups, it will be a success!

Why should prospective students in Maastricht definitely not miss the INKOM?

INKOM is THE week of the year for students new to Maastricht. You get the opportunity to participate in activities, party, do sports, comedy and BBQ, among other things. As you’re getting to know new people, these will become your new friends. It will be the best week of your academic year!

During the interview

During the interview

To follow INKOM on Facebook, click here.

Want to know more about the INKOM and how YOU can help? Check out the poster below and apply for one of the positions!

Want to help during INKOM? Apply now!

Want to help during INKOM? Apply now!

Interview and text by Ashika Baan, photos by Brian Megens

Opening MyMaastricht.com

Opening MyMaastricht

© Brian Megens

Yesterday the website www.mymaastricht.com was officially launched. MyMaastricht.com aims at informing international students about life in Maastricht and the Netherlands. The website contains information varying from when the garbage is to be collected to sports & events. Check it out yourself and find everything you need to know about living in Maastricht!
About the opening, there was champagne and food, so yes it was a success!

Opening MyMaastricht

© Brian Megens

Anti-Semitism Studium Generale and Concordantia Lecture

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture
Prof. Michel Wieviorka

Studium Generale and Concordantia (study association FASoS) were responsible for another interactive and interesting evening as they organised a lecture, with a debate afterwards, on Anti-Semitism. With the recent events in Paris, the threat of IS and the increasing numbers of Jews immigrating to Israel, anti-Semitism can be called topical to say the least. The lecture was given by many times honoured academic, Michel Wieviorka who is a Professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) and President of the Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme (FMSH). The panel for the debate consisted: Moderator, Dr. Teun Dekker (vice dean UCM), Prof. Fred Grünfeld (IR), Aaron Vinnik (teacher at History department), Zakaria Bouders ( President Noemidia foundation).

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture
Dr. Teun Dekker

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture
Prof. Fred Grünfeld

Studium Generale Lecture Anti-Semitism
Aaron Vinnik

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture
Zakaria Bouders

The Professor starts off with clarifying what is discussed when discussing anti-Semitism. The first point is that anti-Semitism is an anachronism as the word Semite can also mean Arabs. Thus, strictly spoken anti-Semitism is not only anti-Judaism. In real life anti-Semitism is seen as synonym to anti-Judaism. However, the professor argues that anti-Judaism is better to use when referring to hatred towards Jews. Second, how is anti-Judaism different than other forms of hatred? Anti-Judaism is different to other forms of hatred as Judaism is not only a religion, moreover, Jews are seen as ‘race’ as history proofs that Jews which converted themselves to Catholicism were still judged to be Jews by society as they had Jewish ‘blood’.

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture

After one hour, the Professor is done with his lecture and it is time for the rest of the panel to shine their light upon the lecture and give their point of view on the topic. In search for sources of anti-Judaism the debate soon changes from anti-Judaism to the Israeli Palestine conflict. I can feel that this topic is very much alive under the audience as Zakaria was applauded for giving an opinion in favour of the Palestine side. Most panel members openly agreed that the only solution to this conflict is a two state solution. As Professor Grünfeld argues, the solution to the conflict is not the question; the complex way in reaching that solution is the dilemma. Only time will tell if his words are ever going to be realised.

Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture
Studium Generale Concordantia Anti-Semitism Lecture

Pirate Week Maastricht

Did you know that Maastricht was occupied by pirates once? You don’t have to go back that long in history and luckily it weren’t real pirates either. The annual entrepreneurship Pirate Week in Maastricht was held from 24-01 until 30-01 and turned out to be as amazing as promised. Unfortunately university deadlines prevented me from participating myself but luckily I was fortunate enough to drop by now and then to get a taste of it.

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

The concept of the Pirate Week is to bring young entrepreneurs together and work on their ideas from 9am until very late for seven days in a row. It goes as follows. In total, 30 people participate from which ten have an idea to develop, ten have technical skills and ten people have the creativity and knowledge to market and polish the image of the project. Teams are formed and during the week, these teams are guided by experts in the field. They receive training, workshops, lectures and personal talks. All in order to help them in developing their idea and pitch it at the end of the week for real investors who can provide them with start capital.

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015
Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

I attended the Pirate Week on Tuesday when they received a workshop explaining the business model and how to apply it on the projects. I immediately noticed the passion as teams were taking advantage of every minute to work on their projects. The heavy debates in some groups also showed the involvement of every group member.

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

After seven days of hard work, it is time to go to Campus Chemelot, located on an industrial park outside Maastricht, to present their ideas in front of ‘real’ business men.

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

The projects pitched varied from making sure you have the right shoe size when buying online to meeting the right people on events to a robotic arm which helps disabled people. All brilliant ideas and solutions to real problems, however, they did not win the first price. This honour went to Pales. Pales is a project that aims at reducing mortality among horses during birth. The project already won 10.000,- euro start capital at the Local Heroes Award 2014 and is now ready to take off with another 1st price. However, Sfitsy (shoe size solution) and City Quest (aiming to challenge tourists to discover a city interactively) receiving second and third place respectively, can both count on serious interest from the investors and might receive some start capital themselves.

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015
Pirate Week Maastricht 2015
Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

After this week, which felt like a marathon for them, there was a mixture of emotions, there was excitement, happiness, relieve, satisfaction and of course disappointment of not winning the competition. However, as much as people were aiming to win, above all they had a great experience, formed teams with which they started to develop their ideas and only future can tell how successful they are going to be. One thing is for sure this week will last forever in their minds and I was happy that I occasionally be part of it!

Pirate Week Maastricht 2015
Pirate Week Maastricht 2015

More information on the Pirates:
http://maastricht.startuppirates.org/

My Way to Make Money with Aaron Vinnik

Studium Generale Lecture Anti-Semitism

As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My Way to Make Money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work. This week we interview Aaron Vinnik who is employed by the university as a teaching assistant in the history department. Before graduating his masters at the Maastricht University in European Studies with a Cum Laude, he obtained his bachelor degree in History & Political Science at Culver-Stockton College in Missouri. In his spare time he likes to travel and experience new cultures. Aaron has a preference for outdoor sports and is in love with his new race bike which takes him to the beautiful surroundings of Maastricht.

My job
As a teaching assistant in the History department, I am employed to dedicate my time teaching meaning I have no time for research. Normally, I teach one course at the same time. I teach at FaSos, however, Arts & Culture takes only 20% of my time while 80% of my time I end up teaching European Studies students.

A regular day at work looks like…
On days when I teach, which is 2 to 3 times a week, I usually have around 2 to 3 classes a day. Most of the time the students have lectures in the morning followed by the first tutorial at 11am until 1pm, the second class is from 1.30pm until 3.30pm with the last tutorial at 4pm and ends at 6pm. Although it’s the same teaching you do, each class is different and that gives the class new dynamics. If students are well prepared, you can give them more space for discussions while some groups need more guidance. On days where I do not teach, I’m either doing some readings to prepare for classes later in the week, or I am making/grading exams or revising bachelor papers.

I like my job because
It’s dynamic, I’m not teaching the same thing for a long period of time. Over the year, I teach a number of courses, so if you teach something that’s not your cup of tea you’re not stuck to it for the rest of the year. Working with students and helping them understand the material is a fulfilling job. As a teaching assistant, I have more experience with academic materials and therefore I can help them better than if they do it on their own. Another point why I like my job is the working environment in FaSos. The tutors get along with each other and the senior staff is really supportive of us, something you don’t see everywhere I think.

The thing that makes the job hard is
Students who are not paying attention. It’s amazing because sometimes even after multiple attempts via email or announcement in class they still don’t absorb the information. You try to be helpful to students but often they disregard it and can even backfire on you. This is most especially first year students in their first 6 months. They are struggle because they’re not used to the PBL system and/or university. Another factor in making the job sometimes difficult is the third class at the end of the day. This can be tough because you want to give every group the best you have. You want to be as alert as you were in the in the first group. I notice that also some students are struggling with this, from 4-6pm they’re not the most motivated and alert which is understandable because it’s also their end of the day. The challenge as a tutor is to give each class the same benefit from the experience, regardless of the time, participants or material.

I got this job by
applying for it. In my masters I was a research assistant for the head of the history department. He made me aware of the position and advised me to apply because he thought it would suit my abilities. After the interview, I was offered the position which was 2 years ago. I started my job in the summer of 2012.

The main reason for choosing this job is
that I knew I would enjoy teaching because I have done it before so it wasn’t far outside of my comfort zone. It was the first job offered to me after university and nothing else was playing, therefore it made sense to start working for the university. Another reason is that Maastricht as a city appeals to me. It’s a good place to live especially as a student. As a student you’re surrounded by students who you can socialise with. Working is a bit different because people have more obligations and responsibilities. As I’m interested in doing a PhD, being able to do a job where I can develop skills that will become useful when I want to apply for a PhD is perfect. In my job I get feedback from experienced and skilled people from the university.

The time I spent in doing my job is..
Irregular. We have a certain amount of teaching hours. In some periods we’ll be working more than others. The reading and teaching within a course is pretty consistent but the time it costs changes from course to course.  Also the amount of work depends on the specific task I have to do. For example, assisting and grading papers takes more time, with all the meetings necessary, than grading exams. However, in the end all tutors have a maximum amount of hours.

I didn’t expect the job to be..
As interesting as it is. Everyone jokes that the Germans have invaded Maastricht. However, you’ll be astonished by the diversity you have in class. You’ll have Brits, Dutch, Germans, Belgians, Spanish, Italians and so on. This diversity makes it interesting especially because in European studies you try to teach about Europe and its diversity, seeing a mixture in your own class on where you teach about makes it a far more dynamic experience.

My goal for the next years
is to start and finish a PhD in security studies or a related field. Hopefully, I’ll be working in that field. It can be for the government, an industry or a think-tank. I want to apply my knowledge from my PhD in a related field outside of academia for a while before returning to teach.

I love my job because
Over the years my teaching schedule change, and this pushes your own boundaries.  Teaching something new demands refocus year in year out. I get satisfaction from teaching, helping students finding their way in the academic world. Maastricht is a nice place to live, although in a couple of years I want to live in a bigger city. However, Maastricht is close enough to a number of big cities which allows me to travel and explore the areas around me. This provides me with new knowledge for myself and to pass along to my students.

Lecture by Prof. Dr. Jonathan Holslag ‘The Geopolitical Case for European unity’

Lecture Europe by Prof. Dr. Jonathan Holslag

Euroscepticism was a big factor in the last European Parliament elections. The main question was: ‘do we need more or less European integration in today’s world?’ The issue might seem less topical today with the attention pointed at the crisis in Ukraine and IS, however, the question will definitely pop up in Europe’s near future.

In the light of this dilemma, Maastricht University hosted a lecture with Jonathan Holslag, Professor of International Politics at the Free University Brussels. His lecture titled ‘The Geopolitical Case for European unity’ is based around the idea that Europe does not necessarily need more integration but more effective integration/representation.  He argues that Europe has overcome several crisis in the past but today’s economic crisis is different, and, therefore, needs a different strategy. It is different on four points: the crisis of European politics, the crisis of the pragmatic politician, the crisis of the welfare state and the crisis of the European economy related to the balance of power. Holslag argues that for Europe to stay a global political power, Europe needs to act more unified to the rest of the world. He gives an example of China heavily subsidising the telephone market and these telephones come to Europe causing major disturbance on the market. Europe had planned to set sanctions, however, China pressured Germany, by giving Siemens lucrative contracts in China, to vote against the possible sanctions. Germany obeyed prioritising their short-term self-interest above Europe’s interest.

Thus, in order to stay an important political power Europe does not necessarily need more integration on other areas than economy. Holslag says that the way for Europe to get out of the crisis is to act united on relevant areas and not give the rival economic and political powers the chance to undermine this unity.

By Brian Megens

Women on Weights, UMsport training program

Find your strength! © Brian Megens

Find your strength! © Brian Megens


WOW
‘Women ahead in academia’ is the current topic of this academic year. UMsport takes it further and offers a programme called Women on Weights (WOW) to make women familiar with gym and resistance work-outs. This programme is given by Crystal Ceh a fitness instructor at UMSport and a licensed Naturopathic Doctor. Crystal is the embodiment of a strong, fit and feminine woman who immediately debunks the conception that women turn into a ‘Hulk’ from strength training, to the land of the myths. Sounds great, but how does a regular WOW training look like? I thought it was about time to find out myself and attend a training!

During the weeks of the WOW programme, Crystal is busy teaching three evenings a week. As the sign-up was a big success, three classes had to be made. Level 1 is given to class A on Tuesday and to class B on Wednesday, Thursday is reserved for the Level 2 class which consists of women who are a bit more familiar with weight lifting.

The session starts with a meeting in a conference room wherein Crystal explains concepts of training and nutrition, also the homework and possible problems are being discussed. Furthermore, this get together is basically to create a group feeling and make the participants talk about what they experience and obstacles they stumble upon. After this 30 minute talk Crystal announces that it’s enough talk and time to hit the gym!

Crystal explaining concepts of training © Brian Megens

Crystal explaining concepts of training © Brian Megens

The Work-out starts with a warm-up to increase the heart rate and get the blood pumping. After this, the weights need to be lifted by the women. The strength session starts with some squats followed by benching, lunches, dumbbell lateral raise, kettle bell swing and he training ends with some core work on the mat in order to cool down.

Carolina preparing for her squat © Brian Megens

Carolina preparing for her squat © Brian Megens

Karissa squat © Brian Megens

Karissa squat © Brian Megens

Benching © Brian Megens

Benching © Brian Megens

Karissa during lateral dumbbell raise © Brian Megens

Karissa during lateral dumbbell raise © Brian Megens

 

Carolina during lateral cable raise © Brian Megens

Carolina during lateral cable raise © Brian Megens

Dumbbell swing © Brian Megens

Dumbbell swing © Brian Megens

Cooling-down © Brian Megens

Cooling-down © Brian Megens

 

Crystal Ceh on the WOW programme
What is WOW?
CC: WOW, or Women on Weights, is a 1x/week, small group resistance training program, supervised by me along with weekly training “homework”, and runs for 7 weeks. You receive a WOW T-shirt, a UM Sport water bottle, and the weekly workouts all for a very modest price. The classes start off with an educational component, where we bust some common myths associated with women and weight training, followed by a 90-minute resistance training session in the gym. It’s motivational, you improve your strength and conditioning, and it’s a lot of fun!

For who is WOW?
CC: WOW is for women of any age and training experience. I created 2 levels: Level 1 is a great option for women who are new to lifting weights, who are unsure of their movement techniques, and/or have little knowledge of training principles. Level 2 is appropriate for women who have been resistance training regularly for at least 3-6 months, who feel confident with most major lifts (Eg barbell squat), and who have basic knowledge of training principles and want to learn more.

What do you learn in WOW?
CC: In Level 1, you learn how to perform a variety of free weight exercises, such as the barbell back squat, bench press, & dead lift, while also learning basic weight training principles, such as progressive overload, recovery and overtraining. In Level 2, we take the basics from Level 1 and turn it up a notch, by introducing more advanced techniques, such a super sets, split routines, HIIT, and program design.

Why was the WOW programme needed?
CC: WOW was created for women to help them learn proper lifting techniques, principles of training, to help them build knowledge and to improve confidence in themselves. Too many times we as women hold ourselves back, in addition to feeling held back or intimidated by our male counterparts. My favourite part of the entire program is seeing how the women go from shy, sometimes timid individuals in the gym, to women who take over the squat racks and demand mirror real estate when training. It’s super motivating to see more women lifting seriously in our gym!

When is the next WOW and how can people sign-up?
CC: The next 7-week courses will be offered in January 2015, with dates/times TBD. We will be sending a university-wide email letting people know when registration opens. You will be able to register online through the UM Sport web shop, or in-person at UM Sport Randwyck. We will also be having info sessions for those who are interested in learning more about the program or who are unsure of which level to join (dates also TBD)

Great that the work-out looks cool and Crystal is happy, however, it is all about the experience of the participants of the programme. Therefore, I decided to interview Carolina.

Crystal explaining the concept of benching to Carolina © Brian Megens

Crystal explaining the concept of benching to Carolina © Brian Megens

Carolina, 19, International Business student and in the level 1 group:
Why did you sign up for WOW?

I signed up for WOW because I am interested in fitness for quite a while now and I have been going to the gym regular for 1.5 years but I had a 6 months break and needed someone to motivate me again. Therefore, I saw this course and thought it would be a good way to get back to weight Lifting

What did you expect from WOW?
I expected from WOW to help me with my fitness and my nutrition. So I know how to do the exercises properly without risking any injuries.

What did WOW gave you?
WOW gave me a lot more confidence. I have never felt awkward to train “where the guys train” but I do feel more comfortable now because I feel that I now know the basics of training, giving me confidence to start a work-out on my own because I know what, how and why I am doing it.

Would you recommend WOW and why?
I definitely recommend WOW. Crystal did an amazing job. She makes everyone feel comfortable regardless age or level of fitness.

So if you feel like you need to hit the gym after the Christmas holiday, sign-up for the next WOW!
NOTE: a valid gym license is required in addition to purchasing the program

Karissa adding some weights © Brian Megens

Karissa adding some weights © Brian Megens

Push-ups! © Brian Megens

Push-ups! © Brian Megens

group picture! © Brian Megens

group picture! © Brian Megens

 

Say Hello to the Student Project Team

Did you know Maastricht University has a Student Project Team? We didn’t either! We had the pleasure of meeting with the four members of the Student Project Team, who explained what the SPT is and what kind of work they do, also telling us about the projects that they’ve already accomplished.

 

© Brian Megens

The four members of the Student Project Team © Brian Megens

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My way to make money with Marieke Nass

As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column My way to make money we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

For this week’s column we approached Marieke Nass, a 21-year-old masters student, who consented to stand at the local municipal elections for the CDA party in the Municipality of Gulpen-Wittem (in the South of Limburg). She was elected as a party chair for the CDA, making her a very young Councillor, not something that many 21-year-olds have done.

Read more

My Way to make money: Ward Zonneveld

Ward Zonneveld at work © Brian Megens

Ward Zonneveld at work © Brian Megens

As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My way to make money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

This week we interview Ward Zonneveld a 21 year old student who’s doing a master in Human Movement Sciences at the FHML faculty. Ward is a typical student who likes to hang out with friends, play videogames and sometimes visits the UM Sport gym to stay in shape. In order to pay the bills he works in the Albert Heijn as a re-stocker.

A regular day at work looks like…
Usually, I walk into the store with my blue Albert Heijn shirt on and go straight to the stockroom to check my job for the day. I drive into the store , trying not to run over customers, with the container filled with goods that need to be stocked on the shells. When the container is in place, I can place the products on the shelves. At the end I clean my mess up and see if I can go home or help someone else.

I like my job because…
Although this job seems quite boring, I get to know a lot of people, colleagues, that later turn out to be good friends. During work we talk about the people walking by, football and the regular small talk, which makes the job a little more exciting. It is also nice to see friends do their shopping while I am working. Helping customers with questions and sometimes even give them advice is also a nice distraction from re-stocking the shelves.

The thing that makes the job hard is…
that I always have to work at dinner time, so I have to cook before or after work. Also customers that ask questions like ‘Where are the eggs?’ when they are just clearly 1 meter away, can challenge your temper. However, the one that is the most annoying is the music played in the store, it is just awful; it makes me want to use earplugs which I of course am not allowed to do.

I got this job by…
As every student needs money, me and a friend sought a job and found one at the Albert Heijn in the Helmstraat, close to the Vrijthof. They had some posters on the walls saying that they needed employees, so we went in, asked if this was still the case, and applied for the job. After a short interview I got the job and could start working.

The main reason for choosing this job is…
I had previous experience in another supermarket. Therefore, I knew that it was relatively well paid and the work itself was not that tough or difficult. Also you have many colleagues and you can work together and have social contacts. So when I saw they were looking for new employees I could not see any reason not to apply.

The time I spent in doing my job is…

Two to three evenings a week you can find me working in ‘AH Helmie’ for a 2 or 4 hour shift, that makes it about six hours a week. Therefore, this can perfectly be combined with the study as it does not take too much time and the study contains a lot of self-study which I can do whenever it suits me.

I didn’t expect the job to be…
working such short shifts, I often work for only two hours straight and then I am done. Longer shifts for fewer times a week would suit me better as it takes less time in preparation.

Later in life I’ll be…
A researcher with focus to sports or rehabilitation. I am really interested in perfecting training programs for obese people and/or athletes, movements and rehabilitation techniques is really my passion, therefore it would be great if I could turn this into my job!

My way to make money with Philippe Hezer

 

Philippe Hezer

Philippe Hezer

As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column My way to make money we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

This week we interviewed Philippe Hezer, a 22-year old masters student, who founded Ius Mosae, a legal weblog affiliated with the Maastricht University Faculty of Law. After the big success of the blog, which focuses on legal issues and persons, as well as touching upon lifestyle features, Philippe became part of the advisory board of the blog, which has since been passed on to PhD-candidates.

Read more

Tradition

Adolf was eating his nasi rames at a warung along the road to Kúta. Our tehmpe was served with sambal. “It is interesting”, he said, “how Indonesia is dealing with the modernization.” I nodded and had a bite of my ayam goreng. It’s great that Indonesians only use Gods cutlery, alias, their hands. Saves lots of dishes. What do you mean with “modernization?”, I asked.

The traffic continued while we were eating and discussing the national changes. “I mean, look at all those motorbikes!”, Adolf said and pointed to the 20 bikes, waiting in front of a red traffic light.Some people are afraid that we’re loosing our roots, that we’re forgetting our culture. We so badly want to catch up with the Western world but we fail.”
I nodded again and gave it a thought.
It’s true though, that some technologies are just not ready for the Indonesian society yet. Try to talk to an Indonesian about biopetrol or electric cars to reduce the emission of CO2 and he would just lift up his shoulders.
So what? The most important thing is that he would get from A to B and the motorbike is the best way: it’s cheap and fast because you can avoid the traffic jam, which supposed to be one of the worst in the world. Part from India, I heard.  And the smog, well, that’s just life, isn’t?

My impression of Indonesia was not that it badly failed in its attempt to becoma part of Western civilization, rather, I got the impression that their cultural heritage is much stronger than other countries I’ve visited so far. For example, on a cultural festival in Yogyakarta, multiple regional dances were preformed. In Madiun I visited a typical shadow puppet play (wayung) and in Bandung, traditional dances contests were held for young children. No, I did not have the impression that Indonesia was loosing its roots, rather, I had the feeling they were holding it tighter and tighter. Working as a professional puppet player or dancer would actually provide you a good monthly salary. Tradition might more appreciated and higher valued than in Western countries. But then again, how many tourist does Java receive every year? Not as much as Bali.

Bali was the exception. When I arrived in Kúta, the main tourist area of the island, I was in shock. Since when can you wear shorts and skirts (or less) here?Tank tops? Bill boards of Quicksilver, Billabong and Roxy were decorating the dark sky. Alcohol was freely advertised with happy hours.  It was a small culture shock, coming from Java, where covering up is a must and alcohol consumption is rarely found. But for the first time since 3 weeks, I felt safe enough to walk on the streets by my own after sunset. No people coming up to me, staring at you or asking for a picture. No one wants to touch you or asks for money. Bali is used to tourists and yes, on this island it might be clear that Indonesia is struggling with its roots.

Outside of Kúta, most tourists visit temples. There is more than one temple complex on Bali and one of the most famous one called Pura Ulun Danu Bratan.,situated on the middle of the island, next to the lake Bratan. This place is overwhelmed with tourists who come in big tour buses, which are obviously not made for the small roads. At least they have A/C, I reckon. “Oh god, more tourists!”, Adolf said and looked disappointed.  I smiled, “yep, welcome to the world of tourism! Have you ever been a tourist in your own country?” Adolf shacked his head. Never. “Ah well, then this will be a new experience for you.”  And as soon we were approaching the Pura Ulan Danu Bratan you could hear French, German, Dutch and several Asian languages floating through the air. Adolf wandered away from the mass to find a more peaceful and quiet spot. Just next to the lake there was some stagnant water where some children were fishing. Adolf smiled and said “if they are going to catch a fish in that, I would be amazed.” The children were up to their thighs in the mud and dirty water, kept on filling a wicker basket.  Adolf explained me that this was a traditional way of fishing and that he had done it as well when he was young. Personally, I cannot remember that I ever fished as a child the way those children were fishing and I was only amazed by the way they done it.

My way to make money with Martin Lamberts Löwenbrück

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As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My way to make money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

This week we interview a student about his summer job as a waiter in the States. Martin Lamberts Lowenbruck is a 23 year old student in the second year of the European Studies program. Born and raised in the USA, he holds a German passport due to his German parents. His German ancestry was one of the reasons that triggered his interest in Europe and come to Maastricht for his studies.

My job…
I work as a ‘waitstaff’ of a seaside restaurant named Jackie’s Too in Ogunquit, Maine, USA. Opened in the 60’s, the restaurant now serves as a tourist attraction for Americans and French Canadians alike, serving both lunch and dinner every day, all year-round. I’ve been working summers at Jackie’s restaurant since 2012, and was fortunate enough to have the opportunity of returning this summer for work, albeit for only a short time, as my work schedule in the Netherlands requires my return.

I like my job because…
I enjoy working at Jackie’s too for several reasons, not least of which is the beautiful view of the Atlantic Ocean over Perkin’s Cove. The restaurant is located directly on the shore, with only a few metres between the waves and the restaurant veranda during high tide. The smell of the cold ocean on a warm morning is one of life’s simple pleasures. The ocean has always been close to home.

A regular day looks like…
I spend about 6 hours a day, 5 days a week at the restaurant. Starting work at 10:00 means I usually leave work between 4 and 5 PM, depending on how busy the day was. With tips for excellent service included, you can expect to earn around $120 to $170 for 6 hours of work, making $20 per hour isn’t bad.

The thing that makes the job hard…
The hardest part of the job, as in all realms of the service industry, are terrible customers. These very patrons, however, can be what makes the job great. Working busy hours and running food on a 100º day will certainly run you down, especially when a customer heckles for minutes at a time over simple things like water or napkins. Despite shortcomings and unpleasant guests, however, good service is usually rewarded with a good tip, unless you’re serving Canadians. The French Canadians, in keeping with good European tradition, generally do not tip the server, assuming it is already included in the bill. If lucky, I can expect a 5% tip from even the sweetest Canadians; they simply don’t understand customs, despite returning every year. The reason tips are such a big deal for the service industry in the USA is because of the low wages servers receive. Servers do not qualify for minimum wage (around $8.00), because they generally receive tips. When the tips are not received, servers essentially work for free.

The job gives me…
Apart from the location, the rest of the waitstaff is comprised of people from all over the world. Having become acquainted with numerous international employees from Eastern Europe last year, I have now had the pleasure of getting to know a few South Africans, Jamaicans, and seasonal workers. The international and cultural exposure that this job has to offer was one of the hidden gems of working in Ogunquit. People rarely realise how much of the tourist industry in Maine survives off the work of young aspiring guest workers. The cultural and worldly experience gained by the locals is just an added benefit.

I didn’t expect the job to be…
as stressful as it is sometimes. Nevertheless, I also didn’t expect the job to be so rewarding. As a server, it’s important to have the ability to sell yourself. The server’s ability to give the customer a nice experience is the fulcrum on which earnings turn. This line of work certainly puts more responsibility on the server for good wages.

Later in life I’ll…
not work in the restaurant industry. It is certainly a high-stress job and teases one’s patience. It’s ideal for young and energetic people who need something to do for a summer. For the seasoned employees, I have nothing but respect, as they toil daily in one of the harder industries. These people serve others when they are not working. I aspire a career in journalism or maybe life will surprise me.

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My way to make money with Nina le Grand

Foto As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My way to make money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

For this week we interviewed 23-year-old student Nina le Grand, who is in the last year of her European Law School bachelor and currently working as manager of Mix & Mingle, which is a recurring event organised by Maastricht University. Next to her studies and her job, Nina loves to dance jazz, ballet and modern. More of her favourite activities include travelling, sports and catching up with friends. Read more

May way to make money with Cecila Cotero Torrecillas

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As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My way to make money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

This week we interview 28-year-old Spanish Cecila Cotero Torrecillas, a second year European Studies student and a freelance viola player. Besides her passion for music, she likes to jog, practise yoga, cook exotic food and explore the world.

Read more

Meet our Student Police Officer: Paul Vermin

For all you new and recurring students we organised a little interview with our very own police officer, Paul Vermin. He was happy to answer any of our questions regarding student safety. You may have met him during the INKOM, or during an inauguration of an association, with which mr. Vermin has good contact.
Being the general contact point for all students, this means that in case a students goes to the police to report something stolen, for instance, he will be notified of it, even if another officer helps the student. Having worked for the police in Maastricht for 21 years already, Paul has seen his fair share of stuff happening. Safe to say, bad things also happen to students. That’s why three years ago Paul Vermin went to the police department of Groningen, as the police there already had a special task force that dealt with student-related problems. He looked at how they went about things and asked for advice to be able to do the same in Maastricht. Of course, to start up something like that is pretty hard, however, Paul is well on his way!

by Brian Megens

Ashika and Paul Vermin during the interview.  © Brian Megens

What the police wants is to accommodate students. In order to do that, Paul tells us that you have to create awareness among students, it helps remove part of the problem. Part of this problem is to show (international) students that the police takes them seriously. Among criminality that is student-related, Vermin says that theft, robbery and drugs are among the biggest. To further discuss the latter, Paul names the biggest problem with it. A lot of international students have the idea that doing drugs is allowed in the Netherlands. However, the term “gedoogwet” is not easily translate-able, but it basically means that even though using soft drugs is illegal in the Netherlands, the law in question isn’t enforced. This means that it’s possible to buy soft drugs and to have a certain amount, but it doesn’t mean that all drugs are allowed.
After a lot of coffeeshops closing in Maastricht by the municipality, there has been a rise of street dealers. These dealers often sell drugs that are full of junk, sometimes even containing stuff like rat poison or chlorine. This is something that the new students in Maastricht have no idea of, making it even more dangerous.

by Brian Megens

Paul next to his on-duty vehicle. © Brian Megens

One of the biggest barriers for the police that prevents them from helping students is when a student doesn’t report a crime. After a night out you might discover that someone took your phone in one of the clubs in Maastricht, yet not report it to the police. However, when you don’t report your phone stolen, the police has nothing to go with, and are therefore helpless at helping you, the student! While talking about this, I, Ashika (reporter for Maastricht Students) realise that in my first year, this occurred and while turning red, I explain that I didn’t think the police would be able to do anything.. “As long as you don’t do it again!” Paul tells me. All I have to say now: “Nothing ventured, nothing gained.”
Mr. Vermin also said that it’s so easy for people to break into a house, something that can even be done with a bank card. That’s why when he walks through a neighbourhood and sees that a student has left their window open with a laptop in front of it, Paul walks in, sees if anyone is there and tells them to shut their window or close their door or gate properly.

by Brian Megens

Paul Vermin in the courtyard of the police station. © Brian Megens

One of the things that makes this job worth it for Paul Vermin, is of course to be able to prevent criminality, but also to receive positive reactions from the neighbourhood or being able to accompany a victim to the court room, being mental support, and getting thanked afterwards. It’s not about just processing complaints and having to react to emergency calls.

Being very active on Twitter already (follow @POL_Vermin), Paul says that the next step in order to be more present for students is to have a Facebook page. This will come in the future, so keep your eyes peeled! After asking for some tips he might have for students, he sums up a few pointers. (Some of these are self-evident and well-known, however, still need to be done)

  • Don’t walk home alone late at night
  • If your friend is drunk or under the influence, don’t let them walk home alone
  • Don’t let yourself be offended easily, people do it to get a rise out of you. Don’t give it to them 😉

To take a look at the nation-wide campaign against theft, click here for our blogpost about it.

Paul Vermin the student agent socialising and informing students © Brian Megens

Paul Vermin with some students during the INKOM © Brian Megens

 

If you have a problem, that you want to communicate to Paul Vermin, you can contact him at paul.vermin@limburg-zuid.politie.nl or call the general police number 0900-8844. In case of emergency call: 1-1-2!

Here is a video of Breaking Maas about student safety that was made in cooperation with the police and the fire department.

 

“A different night out.” A movie made in co-operations with the police and fire dep. of Maastricht to raise awareness. from BreakingMaas on Vimeo.

So, to all you Maastricht Students, stay safe!

Blogpost by Ashika Baan, photography by Brian Megens

Security campaign ‘Mijn Straatwaarde’ addresses mugging in Maastricht.

You’ve probably seen the billboards with young people standing with their phones in hand and the item’s value next to it. In case you wondered what the message of the posters are, it’s a campaign called ‘Mijn Straatwaarde’ (My street value) to address the epidemic of petty street crimes. The campaign is an initiative from the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice together with the Hospitality Industry (KHN) and aims at creating awareness to young people for mugging and pickpocketing. Most possess expensive smartphones but are not aware of the street value, neither of the ways to secure these valuables from the hands of thieves. A lot of times people just put them in their back pocket or leave them on the table when dining out, completely unaware that they are basically putting  500,-+ on the table for everyone to see. You wouldn’t do that with your cash would you? As thieves are always looking for easy ways to make money, it’s hardly a surprise that smartphones became quite popular among their desired loot. This campaign therefore tries to increase people’s awareness of the fact that many young people posses an expensive and desirable smartphone that demands some precautions to reduce the risk of being mugged or pickpocketed. Besides awareness, the government has also promised to improve streetlights and increase police patrols. The campaign also gives some useful facts & tips. KHN_busposter_420x297mm_CMYK

Facts and Figures

  • Many people think that during winter crime is higher due to the longer period of darkness. However, there is almost no difference between crime in summer or winter.
  • 50% of all muggings is committed during the weekend and most if it during nighttime. Therefore, be aware when you decide to have a good night out!
  • The big cities are most vulnerable to robbery. 54% of victims are under 25 as well as most perpetrators (80%).
  • Many muggings happen on the main roads to schools and bars & restaurants.
  • In almost 50% of the muggings smartphones are part of the loot.

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Tips to stay safe!

  • Keep your smartphone somewhere where it’s not visible.
  • If you call, do it in the coatroom!
  • When going home after a great night, go by bike or taxi and preferably with a group.
  • Don’t take shortcuts through bad lighted streets and areas.
  • Wear your bag on your body which makes it harder to take it off from you!
  • Make sure that the opening of your bag is always facing your body so it’s harder for other people to get into your bag.

Poster-5 Poster-2 More info? We in Maastricht have a special police agent for students, Paul Vermin, contact him if you any questions for the police.

Stay safe!

Brian

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Ambassador Lecture Series: An Introduction

If you study in Maastricht, you have probably heard of the ‘Ambassador Lecture Series’. Once in a while you will see the event pop by on Facebook or the posters in the library. We at Maastricht Students want to introduce you to the team behind the events and show you what your fellow students are doing next to studying.

An impression of one of our lectures last academic year.

An impression of one of the lectures last academic year.

Maastricht Students: Who are part of the organisation of the Ambassador Lecture Series (ALS)?
Rosalin Süld: My name is Rosalin Süld and together with my team I organise the Ambassador Lecture Series (ALS) at Maastricht University.
With each lecture we compose a core team of 4-5 people who will be responsible for the main organisational tasks, such as promotion, press releases, news articles, audiovisual media etc.
The current team consists of Lilly Graf, Maret Ansperi and Benni Martin. I am very glad to have them since they have done such a great job.  We have a great team spirit and we have managed to keep it up even during the most stressful periods.

MS: How old are you?
RS: I’m 23 years old.

MS: What do you study?
RS: I just graduated my bachelors in European Law and this year I started my masters in corporate and commercial law.

MS: How did you get the idea to organise the ALS?
RS: I actually joined the ALS team when it already had been set up , but it was still a very new project at that time. My friend and I volunteered with an idea for a lecture – we invited the former Prime Minister of Russia Mr. Kasyanov- and the event was a huge success. I helped with another lecture after which I was offered a more permanent position.

MS: What is the Ambassador Lecture Series?
RS: The ALS is an exclusive project of Maastricht University, which is supervised by the Marketing Director where the lectures that are organised by students for students. It offers an opportunity to meet experts from different academic fields and engage in a discussion. Even though the title of the lecture includes the word ‘ambassador’ it shouldn’t be taken in its traditional meaning- we always aim at a wide range of speakers.

MS: How did the ALS develop?
RS: The Series has developed step-by-step. It has always been an event, which is initiated by UM students who have expressed their interest in a particular topic or a speaker and have volunteered to help with the organisation of the event.
Over the past year we have also worked on the branding and promotion of the Series. We have created our own FB page (see below) and we have our own logo for the Ambassador Lecture Series.

We are very glad to have the support of Maastricht School of Management with the upcoming motivational lecture. They have shown much interest in it and for us it has been a pleasure working with them. Next to that, we are always looking for companies to work with.

MS: Why is it important for students to visit these lectures?
RS: With each lecture we try to create an environment of lively discussion. Students can express themselves on the topic and get feedback from experts. We also aim to invite only high profile guest speakers whose speech will be of extra value to students and will create certain emotions.

MS: Do you only organise lectures or also other kinds of events?
RS: We are only involved with the usual ALS lectures, but we are also open to debate-oriented events.

MS: If people are interested in joining, what are you looking for?
RS: People are always welcome to join our ambitious team. We are looking for enthusiastic, passionate students with big ideas. They should be able to work in a team and they should be communicative and responsible.

MS: Can people suggest new speakers to the team?
RS: Absolutely! We consider all the suggestions, but only the very best ones will survive 🙂

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An impression of when Mr László Andor, the EU Commissioner for employment, social affairs and inclusion, took part in the Series last academic year.

To follow the latest news of the Ambassador Lecture Series on Facebook, click here

A good example of one of our events is our very next lecture with Robin Sieger, who is a world-class expert on motivation and success. For more information check: https://www.facebook.com/events/543178915811114/

 

 

My way to make money with Maphrida Forichi

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As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column My way to make money we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work. 

This week we interview the student with probably the most recognizable face within the university: Maphrida Forichi. Although her job is a non-paid one, albeit compensated, we’re happy to make an exception. She is an executive secretary, reporter and editor at Breaking Maas. Breaking Maas is the well-known news/entertainment show made by students in Maastricht. With each episode getting tons of views on their YouTube channel, Breaking Maas has grown to almost a cult-status. Maphrida is a 21 year old second year Arts & Culture student with broad interests, from theatre to travelling to cooking and getting fit, but everyone who knows her is aware that socialising while doing her other interests is her thing.

A regular day looks like…
In preparation for a report I regularly come up with a report idea, pitch it to my team, brainstorm on creative executions, do background research on the topic or person and prepare questions. On the day of the report, I pick an appropriate outfit, show up with a camera person from the team, be awesome and talk to a bunch of people and make sure I do something funny (or at least, I think I can be funny… sometimes). While filming, it’s very important to have the structure of the final outcome in mind, so you have to have an idea of how you will edit the report already. It makes it so much easier to put it all together in the end!

The thing that makes the job hard…
is being able to satisfy everybody. It is almost impossible actually. Our main target audience are students in Maastricht who naturally have varying tastes and interests, so we try our best to produce shows that are appealing and interesting for everybody. If that was truly possible, we would have 16,000 views for every episode. But we would like to believe that our episodes are entertaining!

I got this job by…
auditioning for the role of reporter. I was SUPER nervous even though I am a very outgoing person. I soon learned how to edit, and I now I edit most of my reports on my own. I feel like this job is exactly what I want to be doing with my spare time in university. Breaking Maas inspires individual creativity and allows you to pursue your interests.

My main reason for choosing this job…
was that it added more value to my studies. I am studying Arts and Culture and plan on majoring in Media Culture in my second year, and Breaking Maas helps me combine the theory from my studies with the practicality of actually researching and producing a show.

I would say I spend…
10 hours on average every week doing stuff for Breaking Maas – from attending meetings every Tuesday to reporting and editing. This academic year, I will definitely spend even more time since I am now in the management board. But hey, I love my job! I never complain about the hours. I do, however, expect it to be quite stressful this year, not going to lie!

I didn’t expect the job to be…
this awesome! Of course I knew it would be fun, but I didn’t expect to love it this much. The Breaking Maas crew is absolutely awesome. Not to mention all the cakes and goodies we usually have at meetings. Yum!

I love my job…
because I believe one of the most important university experiences is meeting people. Covering events as a reporter at Breaking Maas has helped me meet people of various ages, cultures and nationalities, from various campuses and occupations. I also like my job because it encompasses both my passion for journalism and production!

Later in life I’ll be…
on CNN, definitely as a reporter though, not an anchor. Or I will have my own talk show but that will just be a side hustle. My main aspiration is to build a Media Empire with my sister Ewa Przybyl. Watch this space for ME Productions!

My Way to Make Money with Rasa Kuisytė

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As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column My way to make money we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.
This week we interview Rasa Kuisyte a 20 year old Lithuanian 2nd year European Studies student who is a supervisor in the Talk2Students team which is part of the marketing and communication department of the University.

Read more

Ice Bucket Challenge Maastricht Students and BreakingMaas

The ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ has gone viral. Celebrities like Bill Gates, Charlie Sheen, and the one and only Justin Bieber, have participated in the challenge creating the publicity that have turned it into a hype.  Your timeline is probably filled with people posting their video and nominations, perhaps you’ve even been challenged yourself. I don’t normally pay attention to hypes where you oblige others to do the same like the notorious neknomination. However, the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ is different; it tries to combine the hype of challenging people via social media with creating awareness and fundraising for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS. My main argument is that regardless of how annoying you might think the videos are, the action deserves everyone’s support. However, people participating in the challenge do need to be aware that the main aim is fundraising and publicity for the disease ALS and not the five minutes of fame. The crazier the challenge the better, but it needs to be utilised towards a higher goal. Therefore, I decided to hatch a plan for my own Ice Bucket Challenge. Together with BreakingMaas, we thought it would be a good idea to make a report on it. Ayse Sarah from BreakingMaas was brave enough to join me and take up the challenge. If you’re wondering why I’m only wearing a Speedo, well we don’t have fancy shirts of Maastricht Students like BreakingMaas have. Enough has been said, now it’s time to look at the video yourself!

We have made the donation and as said in the video, we now challenge all UM students to come up with your own original Ice Bucket Challenge and donate money for the ALS foundation!

Donate now!

Brian, Ashika and the BreakingMaas crew.

INKOM day 5: Maastricht Market, Mosae Master and BBQ

The last and final day of INKOM has arrived, you can see the toll of a rough week on the students. At noon, the Maastricht Market kicks off the last day. On this infomarket associations, companies, religions, sport clubs, political parties have their stand and students can go there for information. Free brunch and coffee is provided and lots of stand offer free giveaways and food. As the students partied the day before, it was quite empty until 1pm. However, students are students and will not skip free food, so it eventually got pretty busy as you can see on the pictures!

Overview of the infomarket © Brian Megens

Overview of the infomarket © Brian Megens

BreakingMaas reporting © Brian Megens

BreakingMaas reporting © Brian Megens

Fire department giving a demonstration Ps. nice shorts © Brian Megens

Fire department giving a demonstration  © Brian Megens

Paul Vermin the student agent socialising and informing students © Brian Megens

Paul Vermin (student agent) socialising and informing students © Brian Megens

The Queu for the free brunch © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free brunch © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free Coffee © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free Coffee © Brian Megens

And then everything needs to be consumed © Brian Megens

And then everything needs to be consumed © Brian Megens

At the end of the afternoon... view from a tower ladder from the fire department © Brian Megens

At the end of the afternoon, view from a tower ladder from the fire department © Brian Megens

For the Master students INKOM offered the Mosae Master. An event where the Master students could get together and find information useful for their further career, alcohol in the form of a wine tasting and food served as a tapas buffet were provided.

Mosae Master students © Brian Megens

Mosae Master students © Brian Megens

 

Dinner for the master students, Tapas mmm  © Brian Megens

Dinner for the master students, Tapas mmm © Brian Megens

 

Did I already say that they had tapas? © Brian Megens

Did I already say that they had tapas? © Brian Megens

The weather so far was pretty good keeping in mind that it was raining all day in the rest of the country, however, when it was time for the BBQ it was pooring. Luckily, tents were provided so students could enjoy their food somehow dry.

BBQ at de Griend © Brian Megens

BBQ at de Griend © Brian Megens

© Brian Megens

© Brian Megens

Students still smiling despite the weather © Brian Megens

Students still smiling despite the weather © Brian Megens

Lovely poncho © Brian Megens

Lovely poncho © Brian Megens

 

Enough food was provided! © Brian Megens

Enough food was provided! © Brian Megens

Keep on smiling Jeroen! © Brian Megens

Keep on smiling Jeroen! © Brian Megens

Unfortunately, tonight is the last party of INKOM 2014. For us it was a blast and we want to thank the organisation for making this event possible! We wish all the new students a great start of their academic adventure!

Ashika & Brian

INKOM: day 3, Sports event and Picnic

Today marked the day that the sports event and the picnic took place. We went to the Griend in the early afternoon to see what kind of sports activities were taking place. Below you can see a few impressions of the day.

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The scene at the Griend. © Brian Megens

 

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The terrain. © Brian Megens

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A game of volleyball, anyone? © Brian Megens

Some more volleyball. © Brian Megens

Some more volleyball. © Brian Megens

 

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Climbing that wall. © Brian Megens

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From the Wilhelminabrug. © Brian Megens

In the evening we enjoyed seeing all the groups sitting and having dinner with their mommies and daddies. We hoped you guys had fun. Save some energy for the party on Friday! 😉

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The picnic at the old wall. © Brian Megens

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New students enjoying dinner with their group. © Brian Megens

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People getting food at the stand. © Brian Megens

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The scene. © Brian Megens

We hope you enjoyed it, see you on Friday!

Blogpost by Ashika Baan, Photography by Brian Megens

INKOM: day 2, Day at the Faculty

Today, we visited the “Day at the Faculty” of the INKOM. After a successful opening day of the introduction week on Monday (to read more about it, click here), this was a more serious day where all the faculty associations of different faculties could present themselves to the new students.

Inside the SBE. © Brian Megens

Inside the SBE. © Brian Megens

The atmosphere at the School of Business and Economics on the Tongersestraat was relaxed, as students were walking around the information market. As there is a difference between student associations and study associations, it’s perhaps a good idea to quickly explain.

 

A student association is one where students can join to participate in fun activities outside of university. Examples of these associations are: MSV Tragos, Circumflex, SV Koko and Saurus. There are also a lot of independent sororities and fraternities.
A study association is usually closely connected to the faculty that it belongs to. For instance, the law faculty has JFV Ouranos, School of Business and Economics has SCOPE and so on. To see more what kind of associations are situated in Maastricht, click here.

© Brian Megens

© Brian Megens

As students were enjoying a nice lunch throughout the building, the excitement for Tuesday night’s MECC-party was very much there, so to everyone who’s there, HAVE FUN!

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The team responsible for handing out the lunch. © Brian Megens

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The lunch package. © Brian Megens

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Students enjoying their Lunch. © Brian Megens

See you tomorrow at the Picnic!

Blogpost by Ashika Baan, Photography by Brian Megens.

 

INKOM: day 1, Registration and Opening

The first day of an introduction week like the INKOM, marks a special moment for all the new students of Maastricht University and Zuyd Hogeschool. It’s with a lot of good memories of past years that we, Ashika and Brian, stood at the registration point of this wonderful week this morning. The big-eyed, tiny bit intimidated first-year students looked at us as we were snapping pictures for the blog and for Facebook.

Signs are clear.. This is where the magic happens ;)

Signs are clear.. This is where the magic happens. © Brian Megens

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INKOM: Interview with the President of the Work Group

On the 18th of August new students will be welcomed in Maastricht with the annual INKOM. For those attending INKOM 2014, continue the tradition of living INKOM to its fullest!  We interviewed the president of the INKOM organisation Elsemieke Hoet, a 22-year-old student at the law faculty. We were curious about the plans that Elsemieke and her colleagues have for this year’s edition.

 

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Open Day

Magda

Basia

Breaking Maas