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My Way to make money: Ward Zonneveld

Ward Zonneveld at work © Brian Megens

Ward Zonneveld at work © Brian Megens

As bills don’t pay themselves an income is required, some obtain it by working for a wage, others by starting up their own business and some are so talented that they can make an income out of their hobby. In the Weekly column ‘My way to make money’ we interview a student or a university employee about their job or business and ask them questions about how they experience their work.

This week we interview Ward Zonneveld a 21 year old student who’s doing a master in Human Movement Sciences at the FHML faculty. Ward is a typical student who likes to hang out with friends, play videogames and sometimes visits the UM Sport gym to stay in shape. In order to pay the bills he works in the Albert Heijn as a re-stocker.

A regular day at work looks like…
Usually, I walk into the store with my blue Albert Heijn shirt on and go straight to the stockroom to check my job for the day. I drive into the store , trying not to run over customers, with the container filled with goods that need to be stocked on the shells. When the container is in place, I can place the products on the shelves. At the end I clean my mess up and see if I can go home or help someone else.

I like my job because…
Although this job seems quite boring, I get to know a lot of people, colleagues, that later turn out to be good friends. During work we talk about the people walking by, football and the regular small talk, which makes the job a little more exciting. It is also nice to see friends do their shopping while I am working. Helping customers with questions and sometimes even give them advice is also a nice distraction from re-stocking the shelves.

The thing that makes the job hard is…
that I always have to work at dinner time, so I have to cook before or after work. Also customers that ask questions like ‘Where are the eggs?’ when they are just clearly 1 meter away, can challenge your temper. However, the one that is the most annoying is the music played in the store, it is just awful; it makes me want to use earplugs which I of course am not allowed to do.

I got this job by…
As every student needs money, me and a friend sought a job and found one at the Albert Heijn in the Helmstraat, close to the Vrijthof. They had some posters on the walls saying that they needed employees, so we went in, asked if this was still the case, and applied for the job. After a short interview I got the job and could start working.

The main reason for choosing this job is…
I had previous experience in another supermarket. Therefore, I knew that it was relatively well paid and the work itself was not that tough or difficult. Also you have many colleagues and you can work together and have social contacts. So when I saw they were looking for new employees I could not see any reason not to apply.

The time I spent in doing my job is…

Two to three evenings a week you can find me working in ‘AH Helmie’ for a 2 or 4 hour shift, that makes it about six hours a week. Therefore, this can perfectly be combined with the study as it does not take too much time and the study contains a lot of self-study which I can do whenever it suits me.

I didn’t expect the job to be…
working such short shifts, I often work for only two hours straight and then I am done. Longer shifts for fewer times a week would suit me better as it takes less time in preparation.

Later in life I’ll be…
A researcher with focus to sports or rehabilitation. I am really interested in perfecting training programs for obese people and/or athletes, movements and rehabilitation techniques is really my passion, therefore it would be great if I could turn this into my job!

INKOM day 5: Maastricht Market, Mosae Master and BBQ

The last and final day of INKOM has arrived, you can see the toll of a rough week on the students. At noon, the Maastricht Market kicks off the last day. On this infomarket associations, companies, religions, sport clubs, political parties have their stand and students can go there for information. Free brunch and coffee is provided and lots of stand offer free giveaways and food. As the students partied the day before, it was quite empty until 1pm. However, students are students and will not skip free food, so it eventually got pretty busy as you can see on the pictures!

Overview of the infomarket © Brian Megens

Overview of the infomarket © Brian Megens

BreakingMaas reporting © Brian Megens

BreakingMaas reporting © Brian Megens

Fire department giving a demonstration Ps. nice shorts © Brian Megens

Fire department giving a demonstration  © Brian Megens

Paul Vermin the student agent socialising and informing students © Brian Megens

Paul Vermin (student agent) socialising and informing students © Brian Megens

The Queu for the free brunch © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free brunch © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free Coffee © Brian Megens

The Queue for the free Coffee © Brian Megens

And then everything needs to be consumed © Brian Megens

And then everything needs to be consumed © Brian Megens

At the end of the afternoon... view from a tower ladder from the fire department © Brian Megens

At the end of the afternoon, view from a tower ladder from the fire department © Brian Megens

For the Master students INKOM offered the Mosae Master. An event where the Master students could get together and find information useful for their further career, alcohol in the form of a wine tasting and food served as a tapas buffet were provided.

Mosae Master students © Brian Megens

Mosae Master students © Brian Megens

 

Dinner for the master students, Tapas mmm  © Brian Megens

Dinner for the master students, Tapas mmm © Brian Megens

 

Did I already say that they had tapas? © Brian Megens

Did I already say that they had tapas? © Brian Megens

The weather so far was pretty good keeping in mind that it was raining all day in the rest of the country, however, when it was time for the BBQ it was pooring. Luckily, tents were provided so students could enjoy their food somehow dry.

BBQ at de Griend © Brian Megens

BBQ at de Griend © Brian Megens

© Brian Megens

© Brian Megens

Students still smiling despite the weather © Brian Megens

Students still smiling despite the weather © Brian Megens

Lovely poncho © Brian Megens

Lovely poncho © Brian Megens

 

Enough food was provided! © Brian Megens

Enough food was provided! © Brian Megens

Keep on smiling Jeroen! © Brian Megens

Keep on smiling Jeroen! © Brian Megens

Unfortunately, tonight is the last party of INKOM 2014. For us it was a blast and we want to thank the organisation for making this event possible! We wish all the new students a great start of their academic adventure!

Ashika & Brian

Welcome unemployment!

And now what?

Although it might be a bit early to start stressing about it (after all I submitted my final paper just 3 days ago), questions about the future clog my mind like clouds in the invisible-summer Dutch sky.

No longer a student, no more constant pressure for papers, PBL sessions and readings to be prepared, I will have to learn how to live life with a completely new rhythm.

Summer holidays sound like a good perspective, but I know the thought of “what about September” will be looking at me with a grim smile on its face all the way through.

Internship done, thesis done: optimists would say “you are ready to conquer the world”, realists would object “the [real] world is going to conquer you”. How to strike a balance between despair and excitement?

I wonder how many of you out there are in the same situation, packing your bags for some exotic destination with one hand and sending CVs in bulk with the other.

Probably the best thing to do is “prepare to face the unavoidable”, like a random Chinese proverb goes, and accept the fact that uncertainty is the existential condition of our days.

In other words…welcome unemployment!

Lust for knowledge

Do you know that empty feeling? The burning desire to have something you currently don’t have? All your friends have it, you don’t. It’s that shitty feeling that actually makes you feel useless for a second.

I’ve had that last year. A lot. The reason? I was not studying. I know it sounds weird. I couldn’t even have imagined missing studying at any point in my life, but I genuinely did. It is weird anyway, cause useless isn’t the appropriate word to describe me during last year. I had work, was writing the book and had a pretty busy board year. The week didn’t remotely have enough time.

I just had that craving for being a student again. My brain wanted, no needed, stimulation. It was like an addiction. Take the coke away, go cold turkey and the hooker will eventually have a huge set-back. Perfect analogy. True story.

This year I’m starting my psych masters so that feeling should disappear. Even though I had a preference for biological psychology during my bachelor, I’m now going to start a cognitive Master (Health and Social Psychology). An entire new field for me to enter. My life will be enriched again. Knowledge will flow towards my brain. I’ll be as happy as a binge-drinker at the Heineken experience.

Maybe I should let my mother read this piece. She might actually be proud of the things I call thoughts for a time.

What is the Point of Uni?

The Point?

Asked internally of many a University student is the eternal question: What is the point?
For one, there are the rising standards of education. More and more young people are choosing to go to university and therefore:

BA, BSc, BAE, BArch, BDiv, BFA, LLB

Could soon mean as much as:

AIu, Ghb, JAo, YAb, Czk, MHN.

A degree used to mean getting a job, it is not a guarantee anymore.

University, a universal qualification

A large proportion of the population have a degree and therefore to outdo the ‘norm’ of bachelor degrees there is a need for a Masters degree, and then everybody will have one of those…

It has become the expected thing to do for young people with a certain level of  educational background. It is simply the ‘done thing’ to go to university. Many will go for the party, many for the shrinking job prospects, many because their parents said so, and – in my experience – only some for a real passion for their subject. It has been a well known saying that if you don’t know what to do- do law.

However underlying this, there is the assumption that you have to go to uni, you have to choose something. Is that right though? Should this be the case? Is the point of university not to educate those who truly love their subject and wish to study it for three or four years? Not social pressure. As far as job prospects are concerned, is it really right that you need a Masters in Catalan Identity to work the computers in a bank? I suspect many of those at University do not intend on pursuing a career in academia.

Side note: I have a mini rant to impart on you.
It has to do with the university’s APA policy. I have found that almost everybody going into university have not done their previous education in the style of the American Psychological Association (APA). Most students have to part with their footnote-making ways and learn how to cite in text (O’Sullivan, 2011). This, although difficult to adapt to, would be something I saw point in – had it not been for the fact that all my friends attending other universities do not seem to be enduring such (seemingly pointless) rigorous lessons on how to write in a particular style. They are told to stick to footnotes or citing in text – or whatever you prefer, as long as it is consistent and academic.

I do appreciate that UCM (I am not sure that I can speak for the university as a whole) attempts to introduce the students to not only the subjects but also the way we write about them. However, I feel that the strict pedantry that is employed to enforce these APA rules in a strict manner (in many cases affecting your grade significantly) where the formatting style is equally capable of docking marks as the content – is not acceptable. If UCM wants to be taken seriously by the ‘big’ universities in the UK, and I think it does (many students do Masters in the UK, although this point also goes for many universities the world over, with exception perhaps to the US) – then we have to adopt either a footnote system or a ‘consistency’ policy. The APA style, although incredibly credible, is laughable for many in the UK.